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The Amazing Orgasm Facebook scam (NSFW) – don’t think with your trousers

19 Jun

According to Graham Cluley, the latest survey scam to spread successfully on Facebook is clearly targeting people who have so much blood flowing to their loins that the supply to their brains has been cut off.

It seems when faced with the prospect of seeing a video of a woman having an “amazing orgasm”, common sense goes out of the window for some people and they click the link without thinking of the possible consequences.

Here is the message that is spreading between Facebook users (I’ve pixelated out parts of the image so as not to offend anyone):

Facebook Amazing orgasm scam

Amazing Orgasm
[LINK]

And here’s an alternative version:

Facebook orgasm scam

The links point to pages on Blogspot, where you will then be redirected to a webpage which presents you with what appears to be a sexy YouTube video of what is claimed to be an “Overly Dramatic Orgasm”.

Overly Dramatic Orgasm

The only thing is that they want you to click a couple of times (sharing and liking the video to your Facebook friends) before they’ll let you watch. Curiously, the messages are in Finnish (“Jaa” is Finnish for “Share”). Could the scammer who set up this particular attack be Finnish?

You probably won’t be surprised to hear that the purpose of the whole scam is to earn money – through tricking users into taking online surveys. And through your clicking on the links, you have helped promote the survey (via the sexy video lure) to your online friends.

Facebook orgasm survey scam

My feeling is that the last thing you’re probably in the mood to do, if you want to watch a sexy video, is fill out an online survey. But that’s precisely the kind of social engineering lure that appears to work on so many occasions.

Don’t think with your trousers, show some common sense. I wish when you logged into Facebook it said, alongside asking for your email address and password, “Have you had a cold shower in the last 20 minutes?”

Maybe then folks would show a little more common sense when they see one of these sexy messages appear on their newsfeed.

What are you doing if you’re clicking on this kind of thing from your work computer anyway? Content like that which these links promise is definitely NSFW (not safe for work).

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Posted by on June 19, 2011 in Information Security

 

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